Making livable environments

 

Shelter Brief 61: Equitable Density: The place for lower income and disadvantaged households in a dense city: Report 3, The Metropolitan Scale

Higher density multi-unit residential developments, such as townhouses and apartment buildings (henceforth ‘higher density housing’), have become increasingly common feature of Australian cities. Across the country, 2016 marked the first time when construction began on more higher density housing than detached houses. New South Wales (NSW) already passed this milestone some years ago,1 and over a quarter of Sydneysiders now live in higher density housing.

In the light of this shift, Shelter NSW engaged the City Futures Research Centre to identify the major challenges confronting lower income and vulnerable residents in higher density housing. Shelter NSW is concerned to explore and highlight how contemporary  urbanisation processes disproportionately affect more vulnerable social groups. These reports provide a summary of the research evidence currently available to answer these questions, as well as an indication of the gaps in evidence.

This third report explores the issue from the metropolitan scale.  The other 2 consider the building scale and the neighbourhood scale.

 

Shelter Brief 61: Equitable Density - the place for lower income and disadvantaged households in a dense city. Report 2, The Neighbourhood Scale

Higher density multi-unit residential developments, such as townhouses and apartment buildings (henceforth ‘higher density housing’), have become increasingly common feature of Australian cities. Across the country, 2016 marked the first time when construction began on more higher density housing than detached houses. New South Wales (NSW) already passed this milestone some years ago,1 and over a quarter of Sydneysiders now live in higher density housing.

In the light of this shift, Shelter NSW engaged the City Futures Research Centre to identify the major challenges confronting lower income and vulnerable residents in higher density housing. Shelter NSW is concerned to explore and highlight how contemporary  urbanisation processes disproportionately affect more vulnerable social groups. These reports provide a summary of the research evidence currently available to answer these questions, as well as an indication of the gaps in evidence.

This second report explores the issue from the neighbourhood scale.  The other 2 consider the building scale and the metropolitan scale.

 

Shelter Brief 61: Equitable Density - the place for lower income and disadvantaged households in a dense city. Report 1, The Building Scale

Higher density multi-unit residential developments, such as townhouses and apartment buildings (henceforth ‘higher density housing’), have become increasingly common feature of Australian cities. Across the country, 2016 marked the first time when construction began on more higher density housing than detached houses. New South Wales (NSW) already passed this milestone some years ago, and over a quarter of Sydneysiders now live in higher density housing.

In the light of this shift, Shelter NSW engaged the City Futures Research Centre to identify the major challenges confronting lower income and vulnerable residents in higher density housing. Shelter NSW is concerned to explore and highlight how contemporary urbanisation processes disproportionately affect more vulnerable social groups. These reports provide a summary of the research evidence currently available to answer these questions, as well as an indication of the gaps in evidence.

This first report explores the issue from the metropolitan scale.  The other 2 consider the neighbourhood scale and the metropolitan scale.

 


 

Good housing doesn’t stop at the front door. It is important that housing is located in communities which are good places to live, within easy reach of transport, employment, education and essential services.

National Shelter has been active in promoting good policies for urban and regional development, and in drawing the connections between urban planning and housing affordability and quality.

Our cities, our future

The Commonwealth Department of Infrastructure and Transport conducted a consultation process through the early part of 2010 to develop a national urban policy. The final policy document, Our cities, our future, was released in May 2011. National Shelter provided a detailed submission to this process, outlining some of the key housing aspects of urban development and particularly issues of affordability in housing.